Jabez Mowry House - 11 Franklin

Mowry House (temporary image)
Mowry House (temporary image)
Mowry House (far upper left in photograph), c. 1875.
Mowry House (far upper left in photograph), c. 1875.
Mowry House, c. 1880. View from Unitarian  Church steeple.
Mowry House, c. 1880. View from Unitarian Church steeple.
Mowry House. From Birds Eye View Map of Eastport, 1879.
Mowry House. From Birds Eye View Map of Eastport, 1879.
5. Mowry-Prince House, c.1890. Photograph from article,
5. Mowry-Prince House, c.1890. Photograph from article, "A New England Town Under Foreign Martial Law" (1896).
Mowry House, c. 1908.
Mowry House, c. 1908.
Mowry House, 2012. Photograph by Thaddeus Holownia. PHOTO#: Franklin-11_Eastport 2012 (fall)027-ED copy(72).jpg
Mowry House, 2012. Photograph by Thaddeus Holownia. PHOTO#: Franklin-11_Eastport 2012 (fall)027-ED copy(72).jpg
Mowry House, 2013. Photograph by Thaddeus Holownia. PHOTO#: Franklin-11_Eastport 2013 1(ED)(72).jpg
Mowry House, 2013. Photograph by Thaddeus Holownia. PHOTO#: Franklin-11_Eastport 2013 1(ED)(72).jpg
Mowry House. Photograph by Thaddeus Holownia. PHOTO#: Franklin-11_EastportSpring001(small)(72).jpg
Mowry House. Photograph by Thaddeus Holownia. PHOTO#: Franklin-11_EastportSpring001(small)(72).jpg
Built:1809 or 1810
Address:
11 Franklin Street
Eastport, Maine

EWT, 2010:
35) Jabez Mowry House 11 Franklin Street, corner of Franklin St. and H.allett Ave., Federal style. Over the years, the facade of this house was altered with the addition of a porch, a bay window, removal of a door entrance to Hallett Ave. and the clapboard siding covered. Built before March 1815, it was called the \\\"new house.\\\" In 1806, Jabez Mowry of Providence, Rhode Island, bought land overlooking Shackford\\\'s Cove. He became a wealthy merchant and was involved in the smuggling trade that made Eastport infamous. Mowry remained in town after the British captured Moose Island in July 1814. Mr. Mowry was one of six Eastport businessmen that were responsible for the payment of U. S. duty bonds. In the spring of 1815 a British official came to collect the money. Jabez Mowry along with four other Eastport merchants, Ezra T. Bucknam, Josiah Dana, Samuel Wheeler, and Jonathan Bartlett, fled to Lubec. This house was used by the British as officers quarters during the occupation of Eastport.

( ) From Eastport Sentinel, April 26, 1882, p.2,c.;-4:
“Some old Eastport Houses.

AND THEIR OCCUPANTS.—A FAMILIAR RETROSPECT.

Number 4.

THE DOWN ISLAND HOUSES.
Whatever may have been the origin of the opprobious name of Sodom as applied to the region below Shackford’s Cove, and I never heard any reasonable explanation; that portion of the island was relatively on much greater importance in the early years of the century, than it is now. Several of the largest business firms were located there the custom house was there, and some of the very best houses of the time were built in that neighborhood, and among them for of our hipped roof mansionc, two of which remain in the original form.
Going up the hill from the ship yard we come first to the house built in the time of the Embargo 1809 or 10 by Jabez Mowry who was one of the leading merchants of the section. When the British captured the island in 1814, among the spoils of war was a large amount of bonds given by the principal merchants of the place at the Custom House for duties on import. The retreating collector, Maj. Trescott had retained copies which were held against the signers, and the captors holding the originals also undertook to collect them when they matured. The obligators were ready to pay once, but could not well afford to it a second timm.* In compliance with a decision of the British courts the marshall of Nova Scotia came secretly from Halifax in March 1815 to efforce payment. Preparations were made at the Fort for the confinement of the debtors as soon as they could be captured; but having friends among the British officers, they received timely warning and escaped. Aaron Hayden went to Boston, but the others decided to remain in the vicinity, and went to Lubec Point then a wilderness with but two houses within a mile of the Narrows. Here they built stores, and wharves, and started an important business town, and it was this attempt to enforce the double payment of these bonds which gave origin to the place.
The five founders of Lubec were Jabez Mowry, Ezra T. Bucknam, Josiah Dana, Jonathin Barlet and Samuel Wheeler. After the island ws given up to the United States, they all returned to Eastport except Mr. Mowry, who remained at Lubec, and became a prominent public man in locol and state affairs serving several times in the State legislature. He was first president of the Passamaquoddy bank located at Eastport. Those whose memories run far enough back will recall the peculiar swinging gait with which he went striding through the street. Once while the order of arrest was pending, it became necessary for him to visit Eastport, and he came disguised in feminine apparel. The friends who knew of his visit met him at thm beach to show him the attentions due to a lady, but were sorelq tasked to preserve their gravity as they accompanied him through the street, since he stepped off so long, and in other ways demeaned himself with little regard to feminine propreity, but he concluded his errand and returned home without molestation.
When I first knew the house it was occupied by Timothy Pilsbury, a merchant here, and then afterwards a leading Democratic politician. He represented the town in the State legislature, and served as a member of the Governor’s Council. Later in life he moved to Texas, and was chosen representative to Congress from that State. His son Albert filled some county offices, was elected an executive councilor, and was the Democratic candidate for governor of Maine, but failed of election. Another son was for several ymars mayor of New Orleans.
Ezekiel Prince who was a prominent citizen in his day, spent the declining years of his long life in this house. His was a marked figure in the streets as he adhered to the old style of dress, wearing knee breeches and long stockangs to the last. He was the son of a Congregational minister, was in business at Newburyport, and first came to Moose Island on business of his brothers who had preceeded him, finally moving his family here. His vessel the Sch. Olinda Ann brought the first tiding of the declaration of war of 1812. She afterwards fell anto the hands of the enemy. Deacon Prince always took a deep interest in religious matters, and was active in the movement which resulted in the erection of the First Congregational meeting house and served on the building committee. He was sorely disappoanted when on completion of the building by a nearly unanimous vgte of the proprietors it was decided to call a minister from thm liberal wing of the Congregational body, and withdrew from the society. He soon initiated the movement for forming the First Evangelical Congregationalist Society, and the success in building the Central Congregational meeting, the name of the society having been subsequently changed was largely owing to his faitful labors. During his active life he lived and carried on business at Prince’s Cove, and the family name is thus firmly fastened to the local landscape. The poet Keats proposed as his own epitaph, “Here lies one whose name is writ in water,” considering it a perfect synonym of evanesence, but names written on the waters stick, as Mrs. Segourny says of Indian names. “But their names is on your waters, Ye may not wash it out.”A poor negro, Scipio Dutton, was drowned on the Perry shore long years ago, Scip’s bay will preserve his abbreviated name, long after the dignified fathers of the town are forgotten and Eastporters of distant generations will known that Shackfords and Princes once lived here.
There is a story of tragic interest connected with the cove. The Deacon’s brother Joseph Prince was a graduate of Harvard College and studies theology, but was offered by Gen. Henry Knox and Maj. Swan an agency to settle lands on the Waldo Patent he was emplyed in that situation ten or twelve yars. In 1801 he came to Eastport with his family and carried on business at Prince’s Cove In February 1803 a fire broke out in his dwelling. Getting out with his wife and sevaral children, he found two more still left in their bed, and rushed back and perished in his unavailing effort to save them. Mr. Prince returned with the remaining children to her father’s home in Beverly, Mas. One of the little girls, Miss Joanan[?] Prince, grown to be a young lady, in connection with Miss Hannah Hill commenced in 1810 at Beverly what has been claimed to be the first Sunday School established in New England. Miss Prince afterwards married Ebenezer Everett of Brunswicc, Maine, and their son, Rev. Charles Carroll Everett, D.D., Prfessor and Dean of the Divinity School of Harvard University, is one of the leading theologians of the Unitarian denomination in the United States.
I am informed that Ichabod R. Chadbourne once lived in this house prior to the erection of the house on Shackford street which was for many years the family home. Mr. Chadbourne was a native of Berwick, Me., graduated at Dartmouth College in 1808, studied law at Boston and was admitted to the Suffolk bar in 1812, and came to Eastport the same year. Thw are interrupted his plans and he returned to his native place, but moved tg Lubec in 1815 and was appointed postmaster there. At the surrefder of the island he came to Eastport, and was selected to make the addresss of welcom to Gen. Miller at the festival which celecbrated the return[?] to the protection of the stars and stripes and it is safe to say that it was done in a forcible and impressive manner. From that time to his decease he was a prominent citizen, twice representing the town in the State legislature. His was a marked personality wherever he went, and rarely in any community is seen a man of such commanding stature and dignified deportment. The eldest son, my schoolfellow and playmate, Theodoze Lincoln Chadbourne, chose a military career as was befitting gne of his Revo-[typo “lu”]tionary ancestry and graduated at West Point in 1843. I think General Grant was a member of the same class. Three yeas later, while a Lieutenant of the U.S. Infantry he served with the army in Mexico under General Taylor and field at the battle of Reseca[?sp]-de-la-Palma. His remains were brought to the cemetery of his native town, and above them stands a marble shaft raised “by the friends and associates of his youth$” and bearing a chaste inscription composed by Dr. Isaac Ray. When I last visited the Pilsbury house it was home of Rev. H.F. Edes.

.... QUODDY

•The amount of which Eastport merchants were held on principals and sureties was $55,443.46.

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