Lewis Frederick Delesdernier House - 7 Franklin

Delesderier House (temporary image)
Delesderier House (temporary image)
Delesdernier House, c. 1895
Delesdernier House, c. 1895
Delesdernier house (in center of photograph), c. 1875
Delesdernier house (in center of photograph), c. 1875
Delesdernier House. From Birds Eye View Map of Eastport, 1879.
Delesdernier House. From Birds Eye View Map of Eastport, 1879.
Delesdernier House, 2012. Photograph by Thaddeus Holownia. PHOTO#: Franklin-7_Eastport2012(winter)24(ED)(72).jpg
Delesdernier House, 2012. Photograph by Thaddeus Holownia. PHOTO#: Franklin-7_Eastport2012(winter)24(ED)(72).jpg
Delesderier House, 2012. Photograph by Thaddeus Holownia. PHOTO#: Franklin-7_Eastport 2012 (fall)016-ED copy(72).jpg
Delesderier House, 2012. Photograph by Thaddeus Holownia. PHOTO#: Franklin-7_Eastport 2012 (fall)016-ED copy(72).jpg
Built:c.1807
Address:
7 Franklin Street
Eastport, Maine

EWT, 2010:
36) Lewis Frederick Delesdernier House 7 Franklin Street, Federal style. Over the years renovations were made; a side addition was removed and placed to the back and the clapboard siding covered. Eastport\'s first Custom agent, L. F. Delesdernier, built the house about 1807. The custom house was located at the bottom of Custom Street. Delesdernier was a veteran of the Revolutionary War and seNed with the noted Col. John Allen. During the War of 1812 he fled to Lubec to avoid capture when the British occupied Eastport. This house was used by the British as officers quarters during the occupation of Eastport.

( ) From Eastport Sentinel, April 26, 1882, p.2,c.;-4:
“Some old Eastport Houses.

AND THEIR OCCUPANTS.—A FAMILIAR RETROSPECT.

Number 4.

THE DOWN ISLAND HOUSES.
....
The house which has for many years been the home of George Robbins was built by Mrs. Robbins’s father, Lewis Frederic De Lesdenier, Jr., in 1811, and Joseph Pote was the master builder. Mr. De Lesdenier served in the United States army in the war of 1812 and was stationed somewhere on the Lakes, and in his absence British officers occupied his house. He was son of the first Collector of the port who bore the same name, who was an Acadian Frenchman, the father being a native of Geneva, Switzerland. At the breaking out of the Revolutionary war, a number of people sympathizing with the American cause, who lived in Nova Scotia at the head of the Bay of Fundy, attempted to get up a rebellion aoainst the British authorities under the lead of Jonathan Eddy and John Allan. De Lesdenier, the father, joined in the movement and when it met with disastrous failure, escaped with the other leaders and came to Eastern Maine. He received a lieutenant’s commission in the army and was stationed at Machias. After the close of the war he removed to Passamaquoddy and was appointed the first postmaster in the region, the office being at his house near the Narrows to which a mail was brought once a fort-night on foot. In 1790 he was appointed the first Collector of the District of Passamaquoddy, having previously collected excise for the State of Massachusetts, and this office he held until superseded by Maj. Trescott. I am informed that the small building which hm occupied as a custom house during the latter part of his service still stands by the shore below his son’s house, and the stret leading to it is called Custom House street. When Albert Gallatin who was a native of Geneva, came to this country he landed at Cape Ann being but 19 years of age. He then went to Machias and became intimate with Mr. De Lesdenier, he also visited Passamaquoddy and one summer helped cut hay on Frost’s meadow, Little Raver, in what is now the town of Perry. Several years later when he became eminent in public life, and was Secretary of the Treasury under President Jefferson, he befriended Mr. De Lesdenier whose official matters had got a good deal mixed up. Lederney Point at Lubec retains the old Collector’s name. He represented Eastport in the General Court in 1811 and ’12. For his service in behalf of the country he received a grant of one thousand acres on land in Ohio. I remember seeing him in my boyhood, a very old man. QUODDY.

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