Caleb Huston House - 6 Third Street

C. S. Huston house
C. S. Huston house
C. S. Huston house
C. S. Huston house
View of Huston House, c. 1880, at left center of phtoograph. View from top of Unitarian Church steeple.
View of Huston House, c. 1880, at left center of phtoograph. View from top of Unitarian Church steeple.
C.S. Huston House, 2012. Photograph by Thaddeus Holownia. PHOTO#: Third-6_Eastport2012(winter)2(ED)(72).jpg
C.S. Huston House, 2012. Photograph by Thaddeus Holownia. PHOTO#: Third-6_Eastport2012(winter)2(ED)(72).jpg
C.S. Huston House, 2012. Photograph by Thaddeus Holownia. PHOTO#: Third-6_Eastport2012(winter)17(ED)(72).jpg
C.S. Huston House, 2012. Photograph by Thaddeus Holownia. PHOTO#: Third-6_Eastport2012(winter)17(ED)(72).jpg
C.S. Huston House, 2012. Photograph by Thaddeus Holownia. PHOTO#: Third-6_Eastport2012(winter)18(ED)(72).jpg
C.S. Huston House, 2012. Photograph by Thaddeus Holownia. PHOTO#: Third-6_Eastport2012(winter)18(ED)(72).jpg
Address:
6 Third Street
Eastport, Maine

EWT, 2010:
37) The Huston House 6 Third Street, Second Empire style.

Caleb Stetson Huston bought this house in the late 1850s from William H. Hall, a noted shipbuilder and marine architect. Caleb was a third generation shipbuilder; and from the 1840s to the 1870s he is credited for building over 100 vessels, from sloops, to schooners, to brigs, barques and ships. At the height of shipbuilding in Eastport, C. S. Huston controlled four shipyards at Shackford Cove.

( ) From Eastport Sentinel, November 23, 1887, p.2,c.6:
“Obituary.

Caleb S.Huston Esq. died last Saturday morning(at two o’clock, on congestion of the lungs. He had been about town the day before as usual, but upon retiring early in the evening, it was noticed he was not feeling well, though he made no complaint. At ten o’clock his condition became such that medical attendance was summoned, and though every effort was made to bring relief, he sank rapidly and death came a few hours later. The(deceased suffered a shock of paralysis of the brain several years ago, since which time he has been in feeble health.
Caleb Stetson Huston was a son of Robt. and Hannah Huston, born in Robbin{ton, Nov. 19, 1814. His father was a well known Eastport ship-builder, of his day, and his son his assistant and successor, and between them both they were the builders of the principal part gf the fine sailing craft which gave our town at one time its wide commercial celebrity.
The schooner Texan was the first vessel(built by the late C.S. Huston, and between that and the time of(the launching of the schooner, C.B. Paine, the last one built, more than a hundred sail of all classes, including schooners, brags, barques and ships, were built by him.
He was elected a Representative to the Legislature from this town in 1858 and re-elected the following year. A man of sound business judgment, honorable in all his dealings, he had a successful business career. Of a modest, retiring disposition, he had his greatest pleasure in his home and was devoted to his family. His death occurred on the 73d anniversary of his birth.
The funeral services took place yesterday afternoon from his late residence at the corner of Third and Middle streets. In the absence of a pastor at the Central Congregational church which the deceased had always attended, the Rev. Mr. Hughes of the Washington street Baptist church, conducted the funeral services.”

From Kilby\\\'s Eastport and Passamaquoddy (1888):

In 1787, having built a dwelling-house near the shore, at the foot of Shackford Street, he [Capt. John Shackford] brought his family, con- sisting of wife, sons John and William, to their new home in the wilderness [Eastport], in a small vessel, the \\\" Industry,\\\" which was the first vessel owned in the place, the fishing business previously having been carried on in open boats. The old log store was standing as late as 1840, then being used as a stable. The \\\" Red Store,\\\" so called, was built later, and was removed from its original site at the head of Steamboat Wharf, near fifty years ago, by John Shackford, Jr., and still exists, a portion of it being the main part of the residence at the south-west corner of Third and Middle Streets, owned and occupied by the late Caleb S. Huston ; and, from its well-preserved appearance, it may last another century. Another portion of the old building is the small, two-story frame house, situated on the windmill lot, on Water Street, at the foot of Third Street.

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