Holmes Cottage

1. Holmes Cottage
1. Holmes Cottage
2. Holmes Cottage
2. Holmes Cottage
3. Holmes Cottage
3. Holmes Cottage
4. Holmes Cottage
4. Holmes Cottage
5. Holmes Cottage
5. Holmes Cottage
Built:After 1805
Address:
245 Main Street
Calais, Maine

National Register

Historic District



Architectural Styles

  • Cape Cod
SCA, p.5: HOLMES COTTAGE

This Cape Cod style house at 245 Main Street is the oldest building in Calais, possibly built in 1805-1806 when Artemus Ward, a Boston landowner, bought it. Dr. Job Holmes, born in 1799, used it as medical office and residence, sometime after 1836, until he built the Dr. Job Holmes House next door. The vestibule, and gabled roof center door entrance, were added later by the Hohhes family. The St. Croix Historical Society received the Holmes Cottage as a gift in 1954, and between 1979 and 1987 began the restoration which placed it on the National Register of Historic Places. KFM, JCB

National Register of Historic Places Continuation Sheet
CALAIS RESIDENTIAL HISTORIC DISTRICT
Section number 7 Pages 8-9: 11. Holmes cottage, after 1805 - C 245 Main street
N. R. 4/4/88

The Holmes Cottage is a one-and-a-half story five-bay wooden fame building covered by a gable roof. A two-story vestibule and small dormers are located on the front elevation and a large center chimney rises through the roof. The house rests on a rubble stone foundation and is sheathed in clapboards and wood shingles. Facing north, the building has a symmetrically composed facade dominated by the late nineteenth century vestibule addition. The vestibule's steeply pitched gable roof frames a six-over-six double-hung sash window and a paneled and glazed do or framed by a bracketed hood. Paired nine-over-six windows with molded surrounds flank the vestibule. The sha11ow pedimented dormers, containing six-aver-six windows are located above the inner windows. These consist of nine-aver-six sash on the first story and six~over-six sash in the half story. The rear elevation, which is sheathed in wood shingles, contains a trio of asymmetrically placed openings including a door and two windows of unequal size. The windows are undoubtedly later alterations, but the door may be an original opening.

Although tradition holds that this dwelling was erected before 1805 by Edward H. Robbins, stylistically it seems to be somewhat later. Thus it was probably built for Artemus Ward, the property's second owner. The house remained in the possession of Mr. Ward until May 22, 1831, when he sold it to Dr. Shilomette S. Whipple I the first physician known to have practiced medicine in Calais. Dr. Whipple was also one of the founders of Union Church (8) and later, after moving to Boston, is supposed to have become a famous physician in that city. In 1833, Dr. Whipple sold the house to Dr. Cyrus Hamlin, the second of Calais's first physicians, another -founder of Union Church and the brother of Hannibal Hamlin, vice president under Abraham Lincoln. Dr. Hamlin owned the house for only one year, selling it in 1834, to his sister and her husband, Dr. Job Holmes. Therefore, this cottage is connected to each of the three earliest Calais physicians. Dr. Holmes lived and practiced in this house for sixteen years, until 1850, when more substantial means allowed him to build the more elegant house (12) next door, now known as "The Holmestead." After moving from the "Cottage," he rented it to his daughter, Agnes, and her husband, Edward Moore. At the death of Dr. Holmes in 1864, Agnes and Edward moved their family into the "Holmestead," but rented the cottage. In 1954 the Holmes Cottage was deeded to the St. Croix Historical Society by Agnes' and Edward's daughter, Miss Josephine Moore. It had been unoccupied at that time. The Society has undertaken an extensive restoration of the first floor and the exterior while work proceeds on the second floor.

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